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4 April 2012

CIA Covert Operations in Europe


http://research.archives.gov/description/640447

Record Group 263: Records of the Central Intelligence Agency, 1894 - 2002

This series consists of reports, memorandums, messages, summaries, correspondence, dispatches, translations, contracts, receipts, biographies, financial records, itineraries, organizational charts, lists, minutes, transcripts, tables, maps, administrative records, legal documents, chronologies, and other records.

Most of the records relate to Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) projects aimed at overthrowing or weakening Communist governments in Soviet Bloc countries during the Cold War.

The CIA planned to accomplish this through combinations of military, paramilitary, economic, and psychological warfare operations.

Project files provide information about the

objectives, methods, personnel, training, costs, reviews, reassessments, renewals, and terminations of the projects;

assessments of the personnel, policies, and interactions of émigré or partisan groups supporting the projects, and details about CIA creation, support, and liquidation of those groups;

information about the CIA's interactions with other U.S. agencies and the intelligence organizations of other countries;

descriptions of then-current events and conditions in the target countries; and

historical background on the targeted countries and predecessor projects.

Many of these projects utilized people in one, or both, of two categories: Axis Personnel accused of committing war crimes, or of belonging to criminal organizations, during World War II; and former Axis personnel who were used by the U.S. or West Germany as intelligence sources during the Cold War.

The projects also utilized people who were never accused of war crimes or of belonging to criminal organizations, but who may have been associated with war crimes as victims, witnesses, investigators, sources, or officials.

Projects targeting the U.S.S.R., or Soviet targets in other countries, include

AEACRE, which established a base in the U.S. in support of operations against the Soviet Union;

AEDEPOT, in which the CIA coordinated with the Joint Chiefs of Staff to develop personnel to be used as part of an unconventional warfare program if hostilities seemed imminent;

AESAURUS, which worked with the National Alliance of Russian Solidarists (NTS);

AEVIRGIL, which worked with the Central Association of Political Émigrés from the U.S.S.R. (a.k.a. the Central Association of Post-War Émigrés or TsOPE);

CATOMIC, which was directed at Soviet targets in West Germany;

KIBITZ and PASTIME, which developed networks of stay-behind agents in Berlin and other parts of West Germany in the event of a Soviet invasion;

LCPROWL, which worked with two organizations for operations in Germany in case of war: the League of German Youth (Bund Deutscher Jugend or BDJ) and an offshoot of the BDJ, known as the Apparat;

QKACTIVE, which worked with the American Committee for the Liberation of the People of the U.S.S.R.;

the psychological warfare project QKDEMON; and

the research project TPMURILLO.

Other projects in this series include

AECOB, which targeted the government of Latvia;

AEQUOR, which, working mainly with the Byelorussian National Council, targeted the government of Byelorussia;

AERODYNAMIC, which worked with the Foreign Representation of the Ukrainian Supreme Liberation Council against the government of the Ukraine;

DTLINEN, which worked with the Fighting Group Against Inhumanity (Kampfgruppe gegen Umenschlichkeit or KgU) against the government of East Germany;

DTPILLAR, which opposed the spread of communism in Asia by working with the Asia Foundation (a.k.a. the Committee for Free Asia);

GRCROOND/GRREPAIR, which sought to develop and strengthen Austrian paramilitary operations in case of war;

LCCASSOCK, which targeted East German officials and policies;

OBOPUS/BGFIEND, which worked with the British, exiled Albanian monarch King Zog I, and the National Committee for Free Albania against the government of Albania;

QRPLUMB, which superseded AERODYNAMIC;

SYMPHONY, which sought counterintelligence information from Jewish refugees who, aided by the Jewish Agency for Palestine, escaped from the Soviet Bloc to Austria; and

UJDROLLERY, which covered counterintelligence and counterespionage projects run by West German intelligence chief Reinhard Gehlen.

Other topics include

the personnel and policies of Nazi intelligence services;

the role of the CIA in the formation of the West German Federal Intelligence Service (Bundesnachrichtendienst or BND);

the Hungarian émigré organization MHBK (Magyar Harcosok Bajtársi Közössége or Hungarian Warriors Comradeship Association); and

assessments of the damage done to U.S. and West German intelligence efforts by double agent Heinz Felfe.

The series also includes records relating to Japanese intelligence operations during World War II.